Resiliency

Reimagining Capitalism in Post Sandy America

Author: 
John Fullerton

No scientist will tell you with certainty whether doping was the reason Lance Armstrong won any particular leg of his seven Tour de France titles. You know where I’m headed with this reasoning.

Bloomberg Businessweek put it rather succinctly on this week’s cover: “It’s Global Warming, STUPID.”

Flawed, Ignorant and Dangerous: A Bain Capital Partner’s Worldview

Author: 
John Fullerton

“At base, having a small elite with vast wealth is good for the poor and the middle class.” 

This is how Adam Davidson’s piece in the New York Times Magazine summarized the frustrated former Bain Capital partner Edward Conard’s world view, as expressed in his forthcoming book, Unintended Consequences: Why Everything You’ve Been Told About the Economy is Wrong.

A Systems Approach to Financial Reform

Author: 
John Fullerton

I spoke last Thursday at the Congressional Progressive Caucus Policy Summit in Baltimore on how our work at Capital Institute might have relevance to the 2012 Congress’s financial reform agenda. These are the hopes I shared for how policy could shape the Future of Finance:

This Labor Day: Can CEOs Lead?

Author: 
John Fullerton

 

Jobs.  Depending on how you count, the challenge is 7 to 10 million net new jobs in the United States over the next 5 years or so from a current base of about 130 million.  A five to seven percent increase, the sooner the better.  Here’s how.

First, we need to break the challenge down into two pieces:  emergency triage, and long-term structural reform.  The case for emergency triage is clear; this recession is different, for the reasons we are all familiar with [1].

Why We Need a Financial Transactions Tax

Author: 
John Fullerton

 

Speculators may do no harm as bubbles on a steady stream of enterprise. But the situation is serious when enterprise becomes the bubble on a whirlpool of speculation. 

                   - John Maynard Keynes, Speculator and Economist

Progress at Bretton Woods

Author: 
John Fullerton

 

I returned late last night from the second Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) Conference which took place at Bretton Woods. This was the site of the historic Bretton Woods Agreement signed in 1944, establishing the IMF and the World Bank, and creating the global world financial order following WW II.  The Soros-backed INET was established to convene the world’s leading economists in order to rethink the discipline in light of the recent financial collapse, and provide an alternate career pathway for economists interested in doing unconventional research.  A visit to INET’s website will not disappoint.

Progress at Bretton Woods

 

I returned late last night from the second Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET) Conference which took place at Bretton Woods. This was the site of the historic Bretton Woods Agreement signed in 1944, establishing the IMF and the World Bank, and creating the global world financial order following WW II.  The Soros-backed INET was established to convene the world’s leading economists in order to rethink the discipline in light of the recent financial collapse, and provide an alternate career pathway for economists interested in doing unconventional research.  A visit to INET’s website will not disappoint.

My First USDA Conference

 

I attended the annual US Department of Agriculture conference this week in Washington DC.  My job was to participate on a panel with The Savory Institute, organized by the Risk Management Agency of the USDA.  Our topic was “Critical Thinking: The Best Risk Management Tool.” 

My message was about systems thinking, and how the financial system collapse should be understood as the “canary in the coal mine” for our unsustainable industrial agriculture industry.  The parallels are eerie, but I could tell many in the audience were having trouble seeing the connection. 

My First USDA Conference

Author: 
John Fullerton

I attended the annual US Department of Agriculture conference this week in Washington DC.  My job was to participate on a panel with The Savory Institute, organized by the Risk Management Agency of the USDA.  Our topic was “Critical Thinking: The Best Risk Management Tool.” 

My message was about systems thinking, and how the financial system collapse should be understood as the “canary in the coal mine” for our unsustainable industrial agriculture industry.  The parallels are eerie, but I could tell many in the audience were having trouble seeing the connection. 

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